Foresight: Low Carbon Economy

INDEPENDENT EXPERT VIEWS AND EVIDENCE

Low Carbon Economy background

A low carbon innovation service

Authors: Steve Stones, Pro Enviro Ltd
 

INSIGHT EAST’S FORESIGHT RESEARCH PROGRAMME - INFORMING KEY FUTURE POLICY ISSUES FACING THE EAST OF ENGLAND ECONOMY

This is the third report in the second series of reports from Insight East’s foresight research programme, which aims to provide expert insight and evidence to inform key future policy issues facing the East of England economy. We have asked some of the UK’s leading academic and policy experts to provide accessible insights into their work and expertise. 

The series of reports in the foresight: low carbon economy programme are focused on the development of a low carbon economy and the role that public support agencies can play in its development. 

Each foresight programme will culminate in an event where authors of each paper will present and discuss their work. You can find more information on the foresight research programme and individual foresight papers at www.insighteast.org.uk. 

 

Introduction

It is anticipated that the transition to a low carbon world could transform our whole economy. It will change our industrial landscape, the supply chains of our businesses and the way we all live and work. The majority of, if not all, economic activity in Britain will have to reduce its carbon impact significantly if we are to enter a truly low carbon era.

If our industrial landscape is to change in a short period of time it is important to understand what support is required to enable businesses to make this change, especially small and medium sized businesses, and what support is currently available. This report examines the policy around low carbon business support, what is required to promote the low carbon economy and overcome potential market failures and a review of the application of a particular strand of support across three regions of the UK. 

The report looks at the anticipated changes to the business support landscape and its potential consequences for small organisations in the East of England. 

 

The full report